Experiences

January 10, 1979 |

This was written by Robyn Knapton of Los Angeles, California and shared on page 113 of the book, The Man Called the Siri Singh Sahib, which was published in 1979.

In a tiny ashram eight years ago
A young girl sat beginning to grow,
At the foot of her teacher whom she loved so and
She thought she had naught to let him know.
She brought flowers to place at his feet,
And got high as he’d rant and raise high holy heat,
As overflowing crowds learned a new way to cope,
With their lives and their hassles without tricks or dope
They learned to change their “no’s” to “yes,”
And begin to clean up their cosmic mess,
Changed their jeans to purest white,
(Changed their darkness into light)
And she wanted to give him something as bright;
After searching her soul, she found she could write.
As words of devotion flowed from her pen
She knew what to give this king among men:
A gift from the heart given to uplift the world,
Is far greater than gifts that are gilded and pearled.

Read: "The “Long Time Sun” Never Sets"

Categories: Our StoriesPoetry

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January 6, 1979 |

As I look back to the college days, I think of him as a zealous boy scout.  I think of him as a sentinel who felt compelled from within to maintain order around himself.  I think of him as a reformer who took upon himself the task of defining and defending social values.  I think of him as a sportsman, who loved and enjoyed teamwork.  I also think of him as a soldier, who never lost, and as a philosopher trying to fathom the unknown. For Yogi Bhajan, the search of himself had begun.  The time to spread his message was yet to come years later, on the far side of the world.

Read: "The Fruits of Inner Searching"

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January 5, 1979 |

Siri Singh Sahib Bhai Sahib Harbhajan Singh Khalsa Yogiji is the first glorious son of Guru Gobind Singh who approached those Western youth, who were themselves burning with the fire of ignoble passions and groaning under the heavy load of spiritual ignorance and were in utter forgetfulness of the higher needs of their souls. 

He gave them the message of hope, peace, and deliverance, which the Gurus had bestowed upon him.  He preached to them a life of love, goodness and moral endeavor and excellence.  He met them, picked them up, cared for them, loved them and brought them to the feet of his Guru. 

Read: "The Torch Bearer of Sikhism"

Categories: 3HO HistoryOur Stories

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January 2, 1979 |

The first and foremost thing which the Siri Singh Sahib is, was, and shall be, is a teacher.

He never ceases to recognize within himself the responsibility given to him by God and Guru, to share his knowledge, his insights and his perceptions with every being who is brought into his realm of existence.  He has given himself to the service of God and Guru and he has tuned his mental frequency to the Infinite frequency of Guru Ram Das and has given over the use of his mind and body to the purpose so given and guided by his Guru.

He thus personifies the kind of surrender which a spiritual seeker is longing to make.  He doesn’t live for himself.  He lives totally in the consciousness of himself as a humble channel, an instrument through which God and Guru work to achieve their own ends on this earth.

Read: "Beloved Son of Guru Ram Das"

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January 1, 1979 |

By the Grace of God alone, this Commemorative Volume has materialized, for by His Grace alone the man who has come to be known as the Siri Singh Sahib came to the Western World to inspire a generation of seekers.  Through their longing for the Truth, those seekers have marked out a path, it is largely thanks to their pioneering efforts that this historical volume has evolved.

Read: "Acknowledgements of “The Man Called the Siri Singh Sahib” Book"

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As I walked through the street, en route for the first time to the Harimandir Sahib, there grew a welling up inside of me, an inner excitement almost like that of a child on the advent of a special holiday. From deep inside the thought arose, “thousands upon thousands of lifetimes it has taken for this moment,” and my mind at once became very poised and silent.

Read: "Bathing in the Ram Das Sarovar"

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In this story written, by Ravi Har Kaur Khalsa, she imagines what it might have been like to be in the company of the Sangat on Baisakhi Day, 1699.  This story was originally published in Sikh Dharma Brotherhood Magazine in the Summer of 1977

Read: "Baisakhi Day, 1699 – “A First Person” Imagining"

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September 30, 1976 |

The night wind blows in gusts so strong the earth shakes.
And my tent-home billows and wavers under its continued impact.
The darkening sky is shot with lightning and thunder shouts from the heavens.

But not even the monstrous wind beating at all of Creation
Can sweep away the kiss of God, the rainbow,
Which embraces the sky from one end to another.
It comes forth silently, gracefully, to stand immovable in the heavens, yet joined with the earth.
Ever present, it manifests and becomes known,
Only when God calls it forth to stand as an example, a thing of beauty, awe-inspiring.
The vibrant delicacy of its colors,
The purity of its radiance,
Glow as a gift from God.

Read: "Khalsa – Rainbow O’er the Earth"

Categories: Our StoriesPoetry

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September 30, 1976 |

Every second of the day in camp was utilized. We ended our sadhana with a mile run. We breakfasted fast and dashed off to swimming and tennis. We tilled the land in the garden that provided our food. We clambered over the five foot wall and crawled on our bellies through the dirt of our obstacle course. We learned the noble art of Gatka (Indian sword fighting). At the sound of the bell, we raced to our karate class. Muscles that hadn’t even been thought of in years were restrengthened. We were tested at every turn. The initial trauma of learning to fire the five rounds of bullets turned into a feeling of confidence and power, respect and poise.

After our physical activities, we had intensive Gurmukhi classes; each day we read our Bhanis with more speed, accuracy, and comprehension. Our daily Gurbani classes gave us time to sing and chant together. We lived together, stood together and marched in formation together, through the streets of Espanola while the populous looked on in awe and wonder. We daily marched under the rising sun, learning to command each other as well as to be commanded by each other.

Read: "The First Khalsa Women’s Training Camp in 1976"

Categories: 3HO HistoryOur StoriesWomen's Teachings

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